Serengeti National Park


Serengeti National Park

Why Go to Serengeti National Park

"There's more to see than can ever be seen, more to do than can ever be done." When musicians Elton John and Tim Rice wrote the opening tune to Disney's "The Lion King," they were describing the "Circle of Life." But this lyric serves as a fitting description for world-renowned Serengeti National Park. This magnificent game park sprawls across 5,700 square miles of northern Tanzania in East Africa. When American hunter-turned-conservationist Stewart Edward White first set foot in the Serengeti in 1913, he described the journey: "We walked for miles over burnt out country. ... Then I saw the green trees of the river, walked two miles more and found myself in paradise."

Within the boundaries of the Serengeti, you'll hear thousands of animals: Hyenas cackle as elephants trample well-worn safari roads and hippos splash in watering holes. And at any given time, more than 2,000 lions are poised to pounce on unsuspecting prey, preparing to chase their unlucky target through the seemingly endless waves of golden grass. The scenery rustles with the swift steps of loping giraffes, and tree branches shake with every monkey's movement. But the most magical site you'll behold is The Great Migration, during which White's paradise is drowned by a sea of animals as more than one million wildebeest, zebras and gazelles traverse the Serengeti in search of greener pastures.

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